Bubbles & Gondola

REVIEWS FOR THIS BOOK

Click the cover to see the preview

$9.99 •

GET THE APP

NUMBER OF PAGES

80

CREATED BY

PUBLISHED BY

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

October 2011

MAIN CATEGORY

At least 40% off the print price!

On a background of Django Reinhardt, this jewel of poetic fantasy is a fairy tale for all ages with spot-on observations about life. Charlie is a mouse who’s trying to write but has a block. Writing is a solitary endeavour. A bird named Solitude comes to visit him to keep him company. We’re never sure he actually exists but in Charlie’s mind, yet he brings him out into the world, dares him to experience the unknown, unblocking his little existence…

A drama about the blank page for Charlie who so wants to make the world more beautiful with his writing, we are transported into a tender and moving tale with a twinge of lyrical melancholy yet sweet, warm and ultimately elevating.

“Renaud Dillies does something only a few comic artists are good at: he purposefully uses a series of simplistic images only to surprise us when beautiful scenes show up all of a sudden. Chris Ware is a master at that, but Renaud Dillies brings in a vintage appeal that will fascinate anyone who likes old Disney cartoons or fine art.
Bubbles and Gondola is one of the few comics I’ve ever found that came close to attaining the synthesis of high and low art that I haven’t seen since Jacques Tardi‘s comics from five decades ago.” – Panel Discussions

OTHER BOOKS YOU MIGHT LIKE

REVIEWS

Broken Frontier

•Comic book website

“An artistic style recalling Herriman's Krazy Kat and a fanciful imagination evoking St. Exupery’s simple, elegant flights of whimsy.”

Comics Bulletin

•Comic book website

“This is an awfully charming book. Renaud Dillies is a wonderful artist, able to capture the intense and sweet fairy-tale life that Charlie the Mouse lives in, a world of bright colors, intense emotions and frustrating disappointments … Yeah, this is almost a fairy tale, but it's also very French, which means it delivers a wide range of emotions to go along with the cuteness.”

Publishers Weekly

•Publishing trade magazine

“A certain magic is demonstrated when an artist, unfettered by perceptions of comics being for kids, uses the full paint box of tools available to him. The wild imagery, wandering through parties and dreamland alike, transports the reader in an emotional way that propels the practical mind into the escape of art.”