Calculus Cat

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$6.99 •

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NUMBER OF PAGES

113

CREATED BY

PUBLISHED BY

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

November 2014

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At least 45% off the print price!

“It’s never a bad day when some classic Hunt Emerson comes your way!” – Forbidden Planet

Calculus Cat’s home life is locked in an intense, argumentative relationship with his TV set, which bedevils him with commercials for Skweeky Weets – the world’s most asinine breakfast cereal. His ‘job’ is no better. He is forced to run thought the streets sporting his famous grin as The Public shout abuse and throw rubbish. His world is graphic, black and white, jagged, full in, weird, speedy and loud – everything a comic should be!

Out of print for donkey’s years,
Calculus Cat is at last re-published with 20 or so new pages, and a gallery of Calculus drawings from 40 other cartoonists including Dave McKean, Gilbert Shelton, John McCrea, Kevin O’Neill, Kate Charlesworth and Rian Hughes.

“I’ve been a fan of Hunt’s work since the 1970s … His distinctively energetic, surreal, and genuinely funny work raises the spirits and is pure comics. This collection of Calculus Cat strips, ranging back over 30 years and including brand new material, is a prime example of Hunt’s best humour work. What is also evident is how Hunt has mastered the art of black and white comics. No colour is necessary; this is superbly balanced work.” – Lew Stringer

“This comic strip about a suffering feline is an imaginative tour de force.” –
The Guardian

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REVIEWS

Forbidden Planet

•Comics retailer

“We’re huge fans of Hunt’s work … not just for his humour – which can go from broad-based to laser-targetted satire and from traditional cartoony slapstick to something rather more ribald – but for his incredible cartooning art. Hunt can frequently crack me up with a single panel’s art, before I even read a word. This is a rare chance for many to get a look at his famous Calculus Cat strip, out of print for far too darned long.”

The Comics Journal

•American comics magazine

“His mind works on a level untouched by most humans.”

The Guardian

•UK national newspaper

“Initially, Emerson’s drawings seem like straightforward blocks of black and white. However, they burst with detail; backgrounds change wildly from frame to frame, [a] nod to Herriman, but also cumulatively provide the dizzying effect of a Tex Avery animation. … Emerson’s visual imagination is so hard to contain that he can draw a face as a couple of splots of paint and get away with it.”