Fata Morgana

REVIEWS FOR THIS BOOK

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NUMBER OF PAGES

25

CREATED BY

PUBLISHED BY

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

November 2013

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“An entrancing, psychedelic tour de force!” – Broken Frontier

“Jon Vermilyea’s expertise has always been mixing the grotesque and the mundane … This is exquisite storytelling.” – Rob Clough,
High-Low Comics

Fata Morgana follows the adventure of a young boy through the landscapes of his imagination. He encounters and befriends creatures that are, like all mirages, born out of aspects of his own unconscious. Presented in vibrantly colored landscape images, Fata Morgana is a feast for the eyes and mind.

Jon Vermilyea is a multitalented Los Angeles-based illustrator, cartoonist, animator, and printmaker. His psychedelic, candy-colored illustrations and unique designs of the monstrous and mythical have left their mark on a wide range of clients including Problem Solverz,
Adventure Time, Marvel Comics, the acclaimed alternative band Animal Collective, and many more.

This book is read in landscape orientation.

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REVIEWS

High-Low

•Comics blog

“Taking its name from a complex form of optical illusion, Jon Vermilyea’s Fata Morgana is a wordless journey through a young boy’s dreamscape, published by the never less than impressive Koyama Press … Vermilyea’s art is a stunning synthesis of the enchanting and the eerie with a melting, metamorphosing fluidity to it that perfectly embodies the fluctuating whims of the subconscious that Fata Morgana depicts.”

Publishers Weekly

•Publishing trade magazine

“Filled with trippy colors and wonderfully intricate drawings that are easy to get lost in. There’s plenty of violence, with multiple cheerful characters being sliced, gouged, and stabbed, but Vermilyea is a master of drawings that strike that wonderful balance between creepy and sweet.”

The Comics Journal

•American comics magazine

“What separates Fata Morgana from a century of stories a bit like it – Little Nemo and much of Sendak, and more recently Matt Furie’s lovely Night Riders – is that it seems less aimed at those readers still in the midst of childhood than at those remembering it.”