Louise Brooks: Detective

REVIEWS FOR THIS BOOK

Click the cover to see the preview

$6.99 •

GET THE APP

NUMBER OF PAGES

81

CREATED BY

PUBLISHED BY

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

May 2015

MAIN CATEGORY

At least 50% off the print price!

“A murder mystery starring the real silent-screen star as an amateur sleuth … In Geary’s capable hands, this fast-paced whodunit is enjoyable and believable.” – Library Journal

Stepping away for a bit from his growing and impressive body of work in the
Treasury of Murder true crime series, Geary creates a fictional story around a favorite actress: Louise Brooks.

Spun around her actual brief meteoric career as a smoldering film actress who popularized bangs, Geary fantasizes about her coming back to her home town of Wichita where she becomes intrigued by a murder involving a friend, a famous reclusive writer and a shady beau. Not before she gets herself in great danger will she emerge with the solution the police fail to grasp!

Louise Brooks was a famous actress in the silent film era. Her bobbed haircut started a craze as audiences emulated her looks. But she faded into obscurity in the 30s. She briefly returned to her hometown of Wichita, Kansas. Louise recalls, “But that turned out to be another kind of hell. The citizens of Wichita either resented me having been a success or despised me for being a failure. And I wasn’t exactly enchanted with them. I must confess to a lifelong curse: My own failure as a social creature.”

This is where Rick Geary’s story begins…

OTHER BOOKS YOU MIGHT LIKE

REVIEWS

Comic Book Resources

•Comics website

“[Geary's] stark, black lines set against a white background grab your attention and put you in the scene. His informative narrative educates and entertains, keeping the reader's fingers and eyes on the page.”

Comics Beat

•Comics website and blog

“Geary is … the comics artist whose work I cherish the most.”

Comics Bulletin

•Comic book website

“I absolutely love Rick Geary's comics … [his] graphic novels succeed not just because they educate in delightful ways, or because they're tremendously satisfying true-crime stories. They succeed also because in reading them we get an impression of times past, a multi-dimensional vision of a fascinating era that is now in our distant past.”