One Hundred Crushes

REVIEWS FOR THIS BOOK

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NUMBER OF PAGES

100

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ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

June 2014

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“Few of us could craft descriptions (or drawings) as deft as Lim’s. Lim’s one-page bios of former crushes made those individuals come alive for me, while at the same time raising memories from my own past of people I’d yearned for. Lim focuses their attention on LGBTQ people of color, which makes their collection all the more dear to my heart.” – Cathy Camper, Lambda Literary

100 Crushes
compiles five years of queer comics by Elisha Lim, including excerpts from Sissy, The Illustrated Gentleman, Queer Child in the Eighties, and their cult series 100 Butches, as well as new work.

It's an absorbing documentary that travels through Toronto, Berlin, Singapore, and beyond in the form of interviews, memoirs, and gossip from an international queer vanguard.

Toronto-based artist Elisha Lim’s work celebrates the dignity and power of being neither straight, nor white, nor cis-gendered. In 2011 they also successfully advocated for Canadian gay media to adopt the gender neutral pronoun "they".

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REVIEWS

High-Low

•Comics blog

“The Illustrated Gentleman is an article about fantasies regarding and realities surrounding being identified as female but wanting to dress in men’s clothes and shop in high-fashion men’s stores. This was one of the sharpest and most thought-provoking features in the book, as Lim’s drawings are spot-on and worthy of inclusion in a fashion magazine. However, the most powerful moment came when they described their father giving them a tie as a Christmas gift, a perfect tie for them that was like 'a sissy butch dream'. The gift was less important than the acknowledgement of “the real me”, and the description of these feelings was heartbreaking.”

Panel Patter

•Comics blog

“This siren eventually cuddles up to a guy on the train, oblivious to the fact that’s she’s totally crushing her butch friend’s heart. It’s quite a vivid portrait, all in just one page. Lim presents the kind of anecdotal evidence that takes a specific situation and makes it something intensely relatable (your heart breaks a little, along with Lim’s, for that subway butch). The crumpled paper background of these drawings lends them immediacy, a secret, rescued-from-the wastebasket feel.”

Publishers Weekly

•Publishing trade magazine

“Lim makes an ideal record keeper, deftly and diligently representing the words of people who are often unheard and ignored, endeavoring to educate and shed a light on the many facets of these individuals, while questioning and exploring the notions of queer identity… this is a vital and vibrant work never feels anything less than personal and human.”