Red Eye, Black Eye

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NUMBER OF PAGES

306

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ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

February 2007

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“A joyously bleak handbook for the post-9/11 generation.”
– Rodney Anonymous (
The Dead Milkmen)

In the days after September 11th, with the ruins of his job, relationship, and city crumbling around him, cartoonist and roustabout K. Thor Jensen packed a backpack, bought a bus pass and took to the open road.

His 60-day, 10,000-mile journey is chronicled in this ragtag romance. From riding the back of a burning couch in Birmingham, Alabama to aiding stray dogs in Butte, Montana, building a giant papier-mache vagina in Columbus, Ohio to smuggling drugs across the border in El Paso, Texas, Jensen searches for the last remnants of a meaningful life as he rides the Greyhound bus.

Stopping over in eighteen cities, he interacts with a diverse cast of supporting characters, and they each recount a story of their own to him, cobbling together a modern
Canterbury Tales for the slacker generation.

Red Eye, Black Eye is a fractured portrait of life in 21st century America, as the protagonist and his compatriots drink, fight, stumble and fall their way through their travels. It's also riotously funny, charmingly crude and beautifully drawn.

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REVIEWS

Comics Alliance

•Comics website and blog

“By turns moving, laugh-out-loud funny, poignant and horrific. What it never fails to be, however, is an utterly captivating story reflecting (unselfconsciously) upon the importance of stories in one’s life.”

Publishers Weekly

•Publishing trade magazine

“Jensen resists all attempts at sentimentality; similarly, the rough, blocky art makes no pretense at beauty for its own sake, but gets across these sympathetic, quirky tales with brisk efficiency.”

The Comics Reporter

•Comics website and blog

“Red Eye, Black Eye is a travelogue where very little happens, a post-9/11 snapshot in 300 pages, a description of life as we live it that focuses on daily routine more than articulations of significance and meaning, and a narrative focused just as much on the way we tell stories in order to gain perspective and present ourselves to the world as it is its own, ostensible, story.”