Retirement Home Trailer Park

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NUMBER OF PAGES

312

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ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

February 2012

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“This book is a truly powerful undertaking … a masterful piece of work.” – Dead Canary Comics

Things to Do in a Retirement Home Trailer Park is a tour-de-force and eight years in the making, and a powerful, superbly-drawn and deeply moving portrait of a young man coming to terms with his dying father, and with his own life, as he takes care of the old man in his final months.

When Nye’s father phones to wish him a happy birthday, and reveals he has been ‘certified for hospice’, Nye slumps down on the nearest doorstep in shock. Unemployment means that he is free to move in to the trailer park where his father lives, and assume the role of chief carer. Their daily schedule of pill counting and medical checks unfolds into an extraordinary world where the protagonist is a minotaur, his father a rhinoceros, social workers are sea turtles and mobile homes move atop gigantic elephants. Curious neighbours and medical and social care workers – whether man or beast – become their friends, and the family comes together once more. And as the old man battles against emphysema, his shortness of breath becomes more evident until his speech bubbles, previously charged with pithy comment, are mostly filled with pauses.

Aneurin Wright’s unforgettable début is a universal tale of love and loss told in a wholly original way.

“Honest, inventive and resonant, this is a confident and impressive debut; a remarkable breakout work that speaks to the reader on many different levels.” –
Broken Frontier

“Masterfully drawn and touchingly constructed.” –
Brighton Magazine

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REVIEWS

David Lloyd

•Creator of Kickback

“Inventive, extraordinary and memorable.”

Forbidden Planet

•Comics retailer

"An emotive, tender, well drawn, and above all else a very personal memoir, of a son’s chance to reconnect with his dying father in their final months together ... powerful, frank, honest and assured."

Paul Gravett

•Comics journalist and curator

“The inventive symbolism never overwhelms the emotional honesty grounding this compelling memoir, which also contributes to the burgeoning field of ‘graphic medicine’ by exploring in both frank and funny terms the complex impact of illness and death on a family.”