Signal to Noise

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NUMBER OF PAGES

99

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PUBLISHED BY

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

April 1992

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A film director is dying of cancer.

His life’s crowning achievement, his greatest film, would have told the story of a European village as the last hour of 999 AD approached—which the villagers were convinced would bring with it Armageddon.

Now that story will never be told. But he’s still working it out in his head, making a film that no one will ever see.

No one but us…

•••

Originally serialised in the seminal fashion magazine
The Face, published here with new jacket art by award-winning illustrator Dave McKean.

“Gaiman’s typically multiplane narrative shifts between the thoughts and emotions of the man during his final days and the historical drama unfolding in his head, asking questions about what art is and what is merely its shadow, as well as examining the meaning of death and the possibility of immortality.”
—Publishers Weekly

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REVIEWS

Grovel

•Graphic novel review site

Gaiman's words are haunting, full of anguish and regret…McKean's artwork is stunningly rendered in mixed media, with photo-realistic painting next to fallen leaves and bits of old clocks. McKean has an amazing ability to bring more to the party than a simple interpretation of the script, adding a further layer of metaphor to Gaiman's writing… if you prefer your art to be about realistic people in realistic situations, suffering the highs and lows of the human condition, this is a work of fiction you'll treasure, both for its physical and its metaphysical beauty.

Publishers Weekly

•Publishing trade magazine

Gaiman’s typically multiplane narrative shifts between the thoughts and emotions of the man during his final days and the historical drama unfolding in his head, asking questions about what art is and what is merely its shadow, as well as examining the meaning of death and the possibility of immortality.

Shelf Abuse

•Review site

Gaiman’s style is, as ever, more emotional than cerebral, managing to avoid the academically philosophical pitfalls a lesser writer would rely on. Maybe that’s the only way to describe Signal’s narrative, as an emotion rather than a story, one tragic, desperate final moment. Score: 8/10.