Whatever

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NUMBER OF PAGES

113

CREATED BY

PUBLISHED BY

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

July 2013

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Stevens has the potential to be one of this generations finest illustrators.” – Dustin Cabeal, Comic Bastards

Whatever
showcases a remarkable collection of humorous and beautifully drawn short stories by artist Karl Stevens, the creator of Failure and Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist The Lodger.

Set in the world of young artists, dreamers, drinkers, layabouts and dime-store deep thinkers of bohemian Allston, Massachusetts, the strips – originally published in
The Boston Phoenix – are revealing snapshots of real-life urban America at the dawn of the 21st century.

I think Stevens’ work is frequently funny, I like the cultural milieu he’s chosen to document, and he’s learned to make effective use of his ability to craft stop-and-stare visuals.” – Tom Spurgeon, The Comics Reporter

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REVIEWS

High-Low

•Comics blog

“Karl Stevens is known for his photorealist comics, using a dense amount of cross-hatching, shading and color to bring his drawings to life … At heart, Stevens has a real ear for funny anecdotes and how to relate them. Some of them are provoked by his own weirdness or silliness, but others are simple sharply observed and rendered so as to provide the funniest outcome.” – Rob Clough

Publishers Weekly

•Publishing trade magazine

“Karl Stevens’ strips … [are] irreverent, satirical and thoroughly eccentric.”

TIME magazine

•News and entertainment magazine

“Stevens’ artwork … is rendered with fanatical care, just about as realistically as it’s possible to do freehand. (He’s noted that most of his comics use photographs as reference, but he draws them from observation rather than lightboxing.) In particular, most of his black-and-white strips are drawn with micro-detailed crosshatched textures, and his color paintings are precisely observed and modeled, too: he’s really focused on depicting gradations of light and shadow as accurately as they can be approximated by hand without that hand falling off.” – Douglas Wolk