At the Mountains of Madness

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NUMBER OF PAGES

122

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ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

October 2010

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“I could not help feeling that they were evil things – mountains of madness whose farther slopes looked out over some accursed ultimate abyss…”

A tale of terror unlike any other. The barren, windswept interior of the Antarctic plateau was lifeless or so the expedition from Miskatonic University thought. Then they found strange fossils of unheard-of creatures, carved stones tens of millions of years old and, finally, the unspeakable, mind-twisting terror of the City of the Old Ones.

By taking scientific fact so seriously,
At the Mountains of Madness (1936), H.P. Lovecraft’s classic take on the “heroic age” of polar exploration, helped to define a new era in 20th-century science-fiction.

The exclusive SEQUENTIAL expanded version includes audio commentary for selected pages by I.N.J. Culbard, plus a special video sketch.

“There's been a lot of Lovecraftian work over the past few years, but [this] may be the best of them all.” –
Pornokitsch

• Winner of the British Fantasy Awards 2011

• The Observer
Graphic Novel of the Month

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REVIEWS

Mass Movement

•News and reviews magazine

“Each frame is testament to Culbard's love of the source material, and is beautifully rendered, feeling more like an animated film than a book.”

Publishers Weekly

•Publishing trade magazine

“Lovecraft was a master of writing about indescribable horrors whose visages violate the laws of nature in unsettling ways. Right off the bat, this creates a problem for anyone seeking to translate his work into a visual medium: how to keep the sense of unspoken tension and dread? Artist I.N.J. Culbard addressed this concern admirably by telling the story largely through radio broadcasts, which forces the reader to feel the tense isolation felt by the explorers as they uncover progressively horrific mysteries from the Antarctic ice. Culbard also effectively threads a sense of dread throughout the book with subtle touches of the macabre.”

The Observer

•British Sunday newspaper

“Cunningly boiled down [with] superb ligne claire drawings … I loved reading this book … I was completely transported.” – Rachel Cooke