Dance by the Light…

REVIEWS FOR THIS BOOK

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NUMBER OF PAGES

144

CREATED BY

PUBLISHED BY

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

November 2010

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“Quietly beautiful, it’s a book about politics. But it’s also a book about family and a book about love. A love letter in book form, if you like. And something to love.” – The Glasgow Herald

• Nominated for the Angoulême Festival Grand Prix

Dance by the Light of the Moon is a moving love story inspired by the author’s relationship with a Togolese political refugee. It began as a response to the publication of a short story, Message from the Fortress, written by the author’s father, Geert van Istendael. In this, her father gave vent to his feelings about the relationship. At first angry with her father, the author publicly responded by reclaiming the story in this, what she terms, “semi-autobiographical” story.

While the first part of the graphic novel is told from her father’s perspective, the second part is told in flashback by the protagonist, Sophie, to her young daughter.

This is a beautiful, unexpected tale, told from the heart, which reaches far beyond the story that originally inspired it. It tells of a young woman who is madly in love, and a father who, in spite of his prejudices, stands up for her love. More than that, it is about families, growing up, heartbreak and real life.

“Vanistendael has her book in black and white, lightly brushed in a style that is reminiscent of Craig Thompson’s
Blankets. The brush gives momentum to the drawings.” – Volkskrant

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REVIEWS

Comic Heroes

•Comics magazine

“A powerful look into the complexities of the human heart and prejudice, which is made all the more effective by being both personal and honest.” ★★★★★

Forbidden Planet

•Comics retailer

“A gripping story about life, love, differences and similarities and how you never know what’s behind the next corner.”

The Guardian

•UK national newspaper

“A refreshing counterpoint to the hot air that gusts up whenever immigration is mentioned.”