The Amateurs

REVIEWS FOR THIS BOOK

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NUMBER OF PAGES

64

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ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

June 2014

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“This is a dense and powerful breakthrough work from Conor Stechschulte.” – Broken Frontier

A local medical expert and sheriff are summoned to investigate a strange sighting that sets the stage for Conor Stechschulte’s debut graphic novella: a severed human head that still seems to be talking. We flash back to a pair of butchers who arrive at work one morning to find not only that there is no meat in their shop but also that they have forgotten completely how to do their job. As customers arrive, they are too fearful for their livelihood to admit their dilemma, leading to increasingly disastrous events. But what has caused their strange amnesia?

This often hilarious, enigmatic, and uncomfortable book establishes Stechschulte as an exciting new talent.

The Amateurs is great. Conor Stechschulte knocked it out of the park.” – Sammy Harkham

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REVIEWS

Broken Frontier

•Comic book website

“[A] dense, claustrophobic art style … a four-tier page with no gutters between the panels, and while that might seem like a minor stylistic choice, it has a profound effect on the experience of reading his dark material. It leaves no breathing space between panels; nowhere for the reader to look away, even for a fraction of a second, as the events of the book become increasingly horrific. There’s no escape route: you’re locked in with the characters.”

Comic Book Resources

•Comics website

“A story equal parts comedy and tragedy, and shrouded in mystery. Among the mysteries is the fact that in the opening pages, a disembodied head washes ashore from a river. Not the strangest sight in the world – at least until it starts talking. The Amateurs is an unsettling, Twilight Zone-esque tale that marks the full-length debut of a talented cartoonist.”

The Comics Journal

•American comics magazine

“It’s such an unassuming little package that some readers may not know what hit them by the time they get to the last page. Stechschulte’s narrative is one of shifting gears and perceptions, moving between the clutter of immediacy and the fog of recollection … It’s part over-the-top slapstick, part excruciating panic.”