The Lodger

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NUMBER OF PAGES

95

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ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED

June 2013

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“Warm and heartfelt despite itself, The Lodger is an experimental comic about a less-than-experimental man.” – Publishers Weekly

After losing his girlfriend and hip Boston apartment, Karl Stevens moves into a spare room in his painting professor's home, where his bohemian adventures in sex and boozing converge with the rituals of life with a family and an unruly beagle named Cookie.

In a series of humorous, poignant, and gorgeously rendered stories,
The Lodger chronicles a tumultuous year in the life of the author as he grows as an artist and a man. Combining comic strips originally published in The Phoenix, Boston’s leading alternative weekly, with exquisite watercolors and oil paintings, The Lodger follows the Xeric-winning and Ignatz-nominated artist's Guilty and Whatever as a penetrating and visually stunning depiction of love, loss, and the moving minutiae of everyday life.

Nominated for the
Los Angeles Times Book Prize

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REVIEWS

High-Low

•Comics blog

“Karl Stevens is known for his photorealist comics, using a dense amount of cross-hatching, shading and color to bring his drawings to life … At heart, Stevens has a real ear for funny anecdotes and how to relate them. Some of them are provoked by his own weirdness or silliness, but others are simple sharply observed and rendered so as to provide the funniest outcome.” – Rob Clough

Publishers Weekly

•Publishing trade magazine

“Karl Stevens’ strips … [are] irreverent, satirical and thoroughly eccentric.”

TIME magazine

•News and entertainment magazine

“Stevens’ artwork … is rendered with fanatical care, just about as realistically as it’s possible to do freehand. (He’s noted that most of his comics use photographs as reference, but he draws them from observation rather than lightboxing.) In particular, most of his black-and-white strips are drawn with micro-detailed crosshatched textures, and his color paintings are precisely observed and modeled, too: he’s really focused on depicting gradations of light and shadow as accurately as they can be approximated by hand without that hand falling off.” – Douglas Wolk